Femur Shaft Fractures

This article uses the femur image from the Wikipedia article "Femur ", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.

This article uses the femur image from the Wikipedia article “Femur “, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

The femur, or thighbone, is the longest and strongest bone in your body; therefore, it takes a great force, like a car accident, to break it.

The long, straight part of the femur from below the hip to the knee is known as the femoral shaft.

Types of Femoral Shaft Fractures

Femur fractures are classified based on the location of the fracture, the pattern of the break, and whether the skin and muscle were torn. Some common types of femur fractures include:

  • Transverse. A straight horizontal break across the femoral shaft is known as a transverse fracture.
  • Spiral. A twisting break causes a spiral fracture, which encircles the femoral shaft.
  • Oblique. An oblique fracture is an angled break.
  • Comminuted. When the bone breaks into three or more pieces, it is known as a comminuted fracture.
  • Open. When the bone sticks out through the skin or a wound penetrates down to the broken bone, it is known as an open or compound fracture.

Treatment

Most femur fractures require surgery, with open fractures requiring immediate surgery to prevent infection. If your break does not require urgent surgical attention, your leg may be placed in a splint or in traction to keep your bones aligned and maintain the length of your leg.

The type of fracture will determine the type of surgery required to repair your femur. In an external fixation, pins and screws are attached to a bar outside the skin. An intramedullary nailing, on the other hand, involves metal rods being inserted into your femur’s marrow canal and across the fracture. Plates and screws may also be used once the bones have been realigned.

Ease the pain from your femoral shaft fracture with Arctic Ease. The reusable wraps offer compression, which will treat the swelling associated with surgery; while the cold therapy will ease the pain.

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